Ann Evelin Lawford

concealment

Concealment

4 min on a loop
Film Installation at Cambridge School of Art, UK

Please note, the video above is a 'singular screen/cinema setting presentation' of the original film installation project, and is by no means a truthful representation of the piece as it's meant to be.

Having explored the thin line between whether a woman is seen as sexual object in her previous film and installation pieces Experimental Film no.1, no.2.1, no.2.2, Lawford is extremely interested in creating further awareness of this subject matter, highlighting and uncovering its actuality by creating a moving image with cinematographic characteristics that fits the norm – as opposed to her previous explorations that differed from the norm.

Her 16mm celluloid graduation film Concealment is a short conceptual film that provides a commentary on morality in the world of female advertising. It explores the vulnerability of a model as she moves through the constructed world she performs in, making the audience re-examine their perception of perfection.

The project was presented as an installation with two opposing screens facing each other. This forced the viewer to decide what screen to look at, and to feel torn between the two. It creates a tension between two extremes: the female as object – a seductive relationship with the audience like a perfume commercial, and secondly, the female as subject – a more critically aware ‘real’ presentation. This more truthful presentation deconstructs the illusion of the seductive screen and reveals the impossibility to the audience.

Each screen loops on its own time schedule and therefore the relationship of each screen to the other is not synced and is in fact uncontrolled. The results will always be different – depending on when the viewer enters the space. The two different soundtracks (string music harmonics vs. detuned sine waves and pure tones) are also looped on their own time schedule that doesn’t match either of the screens, so a different combination will always be heard.

This makes the piece discordant physically, visually and sonically, developing a more heightened aesthetic experience through rhythm and communicating more effectively than a single screen.

© 2012